Morning Pages are one of the most adaptive tools you will have in your arsenal as a writer. As I spoke of before, an all this month, they are a tool that can be used as you see fit. In the foundation of the concept of Morning Pages is discipline.

Writing will always be a discipline.

The fact, in the English-speaking world, there less than thirty letters that make up better than one hundred-thousand words, that you can master and repeat as you see fit. Some of those words trickle out so that more words can come in.

Morning Pages forced me to write, and not think. Something that is alien for a writer. We are expected to be aware, salient, sentient in all we do. From the recording of the world, or in the making up our own, we are expected to focus; expected to pay attention. Morning Pages forces you to write blind. Whatever is on your mind is to be on the page, for however long it would take. Whatever that would look like.

Morning Pages force you to write, even when you don’t want to–and write that out without thinking about it.

Therein lies the hitch. The drive. The mystery and passion of writing. You are a writer, because you write. In that mastery, in the acceptance of what is no longer a hobby, you must seek to tame it.

Writing is a curious vocation. It allows the freedom to test out, discard and revamp the things that don’t serve or propel you to the heights you desire. Morning Pages can only help to help you see what is on your own mind. As a writer, that sometimes is the best way to unclutter your head. From the uncluttering, you can create what you desire. Being able to focus better as you do.

[image from YouTube.com]

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